Tag Archives: egg donor

Two Things Egg Freezing Might Mean?

One of my favorite blogs is Olivia’s View.   There’s a new post there today that has set me thinking.   It’s very brief but it adds in to other things.

What’s noted there is that women over the age of 44 are very likely to have trouble achieving a full term pregnancy with their own 44-year-old eggs.   I suppose this isn’t news in a general way, but the detailed findings lend stronger support to something we probably knew anyway.

So what will this mean?   Long term it seems to me this is good news for the burgeoning business of egg preservation.   Young women (say in their early 20s) will be all the more eager to freeze their eggs.   The more clear it becomes that you will lose fertility as you age, the more appealing preserving your youthful fertility will be.

But this is only useful Continue reading

Second Thoughts

It’s not me having second thoughts–sorry if that heading mislead you.  A couple of different things have gotten me thinking about gamete providers and second thoughts.

First there is this decision–a significant one, I think–from Illinois.  It’s been in the newspapers, but you can read the actual opinion as well.   It’s long and deserving of some real consideration.   (I’ve also written about it before at an earlier stage of the proceedings.)   For my purposes here, though, I’m not going to dwell on the opinion. (I’ll do that another day, soon I hope.)   A bare-bones version of the facts will do.

Karla Dunston and Jacob Szafranski were dating.   Karla was facing chemotherapy that would very likely destroy her ability to produce eggs.   I think this was before the days of reliable egg freezing, but whether this is true or not, Karla thought to preserve her genetic material by having the eggs fertilized and then freezing the pre-embryos.   To do this, she needed sperm.  She asked Jacob if he would provide the sperm.   He agreed to do so. Continue reading

New Case on Genetic and Gestational Lesbian Mothers in the UK

First off, thanks to Natalie Gamble and Bill Singer for pointing me towards this case.   It’s actually a nice complement to the Jason Patric case, which has been the focus of a lot of recent discussion here.

A lesbian couple in the UK wanted to have children.   One woman provided eggs.  (She’s the genetic mother.)  These were fertilized in vitro and the resulting embryos were transferred to the other woman’s uterus.   (She’s the gestational mother.)  The gestational mother gave birth to twins.

Both women cared for the children with the genetic mother assuming the role of stay-at-home mom.   As some point one of the earlier-created embryos was transferred to the uterus of the genetic mother and a third child was born.   (The third child is a full genetic sibling to the twins.) Continue reading

A Timely Essay on How DNA Might Matter

Here’s an essay that I think is a nice complement to the last couple of posts.   It’s from the NYT Motherlode blog and is part of a series by Amy Klein.    In this one (published a week ago) she considers whether using a donor egg would matter to her.

There are several things about the essay that I think are noteworthy given the recent discussions here.   Most obviously, this is an instance of an individual making precisely the sort of calculation I think one needs to make–weighing the pros and cons before proceeding with something obviously serious.

You can also see consideration of both sides of the balance.  Continue reading

A Bit More On Who Raises You Plus The Other Side of the Balance

I know there’s a lot of discussion in the comments to the last post, and of course I’m quite happy about that.   Discussion is good, right?   But there’s a point where the comments become cluttered and it’s hard (for me, coming late anyway) to follow it all.  So I wanted to try a new post, restating some but then moving along.

At the outset, I want to highlight what I think is the critical question here:  “Is being raised by people who are not your genetic parents necessarily bad?”  To me the inclusion of the word “necessarily” is critical.

If you leave out “necessarily” and just ask “Is being raised by people who are not your genetic parents bad?” then I think the answer has to be sometimes yes and sometimes no.   Continue reading

More About Florida Case–And A Similar Nevada Opinion

I wanted to add a couple more notes about the Florida opinion I wrote about a couple of days ago.     And while I’m doing that, there’s a Nevada opinion from just a little while back (October 3) that I wanted to tie in here.  It’s virtually a mirror image of the FL case.

First, two more points about the FL case–what I think of as the good and the bad, really.    And these are taking a step away to get a little bit of a longer view.

The good:   From what I can tell (and I do not have any access to the facts) the court decided this case in a way that I think reflects the reality of the family life that gave rise to it.   There are many indications that both women functioned as parents to this child during the first two years of the child’s life.  Continue reading

News From Florida–Lesbian Mother/Egg Donor Must Have Rights

I’m interrupting myself (though I really want to get back to “social infertility” and what to think about it) because there is an interesting and important new case out of Florida.  You can read the opinion (though it is long) and I’m sure in time there will be press, too.   (I wrote about this case when it was decided by the lower court and you might want to read that, too. )

I want to offer some initial thoughts here, though think it quite possible I will find that I need to revise them as I think further.  The case covers a lot of ground and might have some broad implications–or at least suggest some broader arguments.

The facts are pretty simple.   DMT and TMH were lesbians in a long-term committed relationship.  They wanted to raise a child together.   TMH provided an egg.   It was fertilized in vitro and the resulting pre-embryo was transferred to DMT’s uterus, which means DMT was pregnant with/gave birth to the child.   Continue reading