Tag Archives: adoption

Michigan Court Strikes Marriage Restriction

I’ve only a moment but I wanted to post a quick update here.  A couple of weeks ago I was following the hearing in Michigan where the state bar on marriage for same-sex couples was being reviewed.   You’ll find a series of posts about the case, really for two reasons.

First, like many if not all of the marriage cases, the MI challenges was (in part) about marriage and children.   The plaintiffs were two women raising children.  Because they could not marry they could not adopt each other’s children–thus each child had only one legal parent.   The women initially challenged Michigan’s refusal to let them adopt each other’s children and did not seek to marry.   The judge suggested adding the question of whether the root problem was their inability to marry.  Continue reading

Update on UT/CO Unmarried Father Case

My thanks to TAO, who pointed me towards this story in a comment to the last post.   I had written about the case two years ago, but would surely have missed this chance to follow up on it.

I’ll leave folks to go back and read either the earlier post (I just linked to it) or the article for the facts.    They are rather long and complicated.   But the short of it is that Robert Manzanares is the genetic father of a six-year old girl who has been living with a Utah couple her entire life.   (The people raising her are actually the brother and sister-in-law of her genetic mother.)

Regular readers here will know that Utah is a state that is very hard on unmarried genetic fathers.    As a matter of policy the state would much rather have children raised by married couples.  Hence, it is easy for a woman to give birth and place a child for adoption in UT and it is hard for a man who is the genetic father of the child to stand claim a right to raise the child himself.    Continue reading

Michigan Trial Ends–Decision to Follow

You all know I’ve been following that trial in Michigan where a lesbian family brought a challenge to MI’s restriction on who can adopt.   The trial itself ended yesterday and now the matter rests with the judge.  An opinion is expected in a couple of weeks.

To recap briefly, MI only permits married couples to adopt jointly–which gives the adopted child two legal parents.   The plaintiffs in Michigan are two women (April DeBoer and Jayne Rowse) who are a longtime lesbian couple.   One woman has adopted two special needs children from foster care, the other has adopted one special needs child from foster care.    Each of the three children has one legal mother (and one non-legal mother–by which I mean a social/psychological mother who has no legal status.)

DeBoer and Rowse originally challenged the adoption restriction but the judge suggested broadening the challenge to include MI’s restriction on who can marry.  Continue reading

Michigan Trial Watch

As you will know from earlier posts, there is a very interesting trial proceeding in Michigan.  It’s a challenge to laws that prohibit a same-sex couple from marrying and therefore from jointly adopting.   The plaintiffs are a lesbian couple each of whom has adopted children out of foster care.  Though they have been together for quite some time, the two women cannot adopt each other’s children.   This puts the children at risk in various ways–the non-adoptive mother is not a legal parent of the child.

What’s really interesting is that the trial judge is hearing live testimony from a series of expert witnesses of various sorts.  You can follow along via twitter coverage or blog coverage or the local (Detroit) paper.   I’m sure there will be other coverage, too, but how much can one take in.

So what to think?   Continue reading

A Round Up of Birth Certificate News

I have some hesitation about returning to the general topic of birth certificates as I know many people get quite wrought about it. But there’s a bunch of different stories out there on the topic so I’ll have a go on it. However, I want to try to set the stage first.

Birth certificates—at least in the US–are rather peculiar documents. Some of what is on them at least looks like a historical record. So for example, birth certificates routinely list the time of birth. That would seem to be in the nature of a historical record–a formal noting of a particular thing happening at a specific time and place. (Place is also in that category.)

But then there are some other things on birth certificates that, though they look like the stuff of historical records, aren’t. One–and the one that has been discussed the most extensively here–is “parents”–or as it sometimes appears “mother” and “father.”   US birth certificates do not necessarily list the name of the woman who gave birth–which it seems to me would be the most obvious historical fact they might reflect.   Continue reading

Idaho Allows Second-Parent Adoption

In the category of “this just in”–the Supreme Court of Idaho published an opinion today in which it concludes that Idaho law permits a lesbian to complete a second-parent adoption.   This warrants at least a short post.   I’ve written about second-parent adoptions in the past, (and very recently about  NY decision denying a second-parent adoption)  but let me do a quick recap:

Second-parent adoptions are of particular importance to lesbian families.  If a lesbian couple decides to raise kids, one way to do that is for one woman to give birth to the child.   By virtue of giving birth, she will be deemed a legal parent of the child.  Continue reading

A Brief (and not totally irrelevant) Digression For a NY Story: Can A Mother Adopt Her Own Child?

I’m in the midst of trying to develop a theory of parenthood that solves my “only one parent at birth” problem. (Check out yesterday’s post if this makes no sense to you.)  But I need to interrupt myself to talk about this story from today’s NYT.   It’s not totally off-point because it concerns the marital presumption of legal parenthood, which has been a topic of conversation in the comments recently.

So here are the basic facts of the NY case.  A lesbian couple (Amalia C and Melissa M) decided they wanted to have a child.   Melissa gave birth to a child.   Amalia sought to complete a second-parent adoption–a process that would make her the child’s second parent without disturbing Melissa’s rights.   This is a well-recognized process in NY.

But, according to the judge considering the adoption, there was a problem:  The two women had gotten married in 2011 and NY recognized this marriage.  Continue reading

A Bit More On Who Raises You Plus The Other Side of the Balance

I know there’s a lot of discussion in the comments to the last post, and of course I’m quite happy about that.   Discussion is good, right?   But there’s a point where the comments become cluttered and it’s hard (for me, coming late anyway) to follow it all.  So I wanted to try a new post, restating some but then moving along.

At the outset, I want to highlight what I think is the critical question here:  “Is being raised by people who are not your genetic parents necessarily bad?”  To me the inclusion of the word “necessarily” is critical.

If you leave out “necessarily” and just ask “Is being raised by people who are not your genetic parents bad?” then I think the answer has to be sometimes yes and sometimes no.   Continue reading

From A Slightly Different Angle? How Much Does It Matter Who Raises You?

I’m always (yes, you’d think I’d learn) sort of astonished about the degree to which conversations here evolve (or devolve, depending on viewpoint), to focus on questions of the meaning of genetic relationship. I think this reflects both the personal concerns of those who take the time to write but also (and perhaps more importantly) a larger debate within our society.  Indeed, as I think I’ve said, it seems to me that the prevalence of stories about seeking genetic origins, etc. reflects the same societal concerns.

Anyway, I thought it might be useful to step away from the detailed discussion of individual cases and think more broadly, and I wanted to try out a slightly different way of looking at things.

Let’s start with the focus on a single question:  How important is it for a child to be raised by its genetic parents?     Continue reading

Parents Who Are Not (And Never Were) Partners Approved in NY

I know there is a lively discussion elsewhere in the comments but I wanted to move along and post this case, which I think opens wholly different issues for discussion.   It’s not the first time I’ve blogged on the topic, but I’m not (just at the moment) taking the time to link to earlier posts.

The opinion (which I am uploading so you can read it yourself) considers whether a second-parent adoption can be completed where the proposed parents are not and never have been a couple.  There’s also been a bit of press coverage.

In this case, KAL and LEL are and have been very good friends.   KAL wanted to become a parent and, as friends will, she confided this desire to LEL.  He offered to provide the sperm and be a coparent.

Now if that had worked, this would actually be a fairly easy case, because they live in NY.   Had he provided sperm and had she gotten pregnant and given birth, they would both be legal parents.  But it was not to be.   Conception did not occur.   After a long time trying, LEL and KAL decided to adopt a child.  Continue reading